Patch Notes Update April Update - Patch 2

Nope, they won't. Remember the outcry after Ice planet rework and Fleet Carriers were delayed.
Just because a few loud mouths complain here or make some YouTube videos doesn’t mean that players don’t understand. The thousands of players that do understand just don’t post about it. It’s the same as with any product. Buy a gadget and if you’re happy with it and it works fine, you are (or at least the average person is) unlikely to go online and rave about it. But if it breaks down you will give it a one star review and complain how it sucks. Failing to understand this means you get a very negatively biased view of the actual public sentiment of a product.
 
Just because a few loud mouths complain here or make some YouTube videos doesn’t mean that players don’t understand. The thousands of players that do understand just don’t post about it. It’s the same as with any product. Buy a gadget and if you’re happy with it and it works fine, you are (or at least the average person is) unlikely to go online and rave about it. But if it breaks down you will give it a one star review and complain how it sucks. Failing to understand this means you get a very negatively biased view of the actual public sentiment of a product.
You absolutely have a point. But the issue is that negative sentiments can sway public opinion, especially those who are on the fence. And public opinion of the game effects those who like the game too.
 
You absolutely have a point. But the issue is that negative sentiments can sway public opinion, especially those who are on the fence. And public opinion of the game effects those who like the game too.
Which is better?

Releasing a product that has avoidable & easily identified bugs, or not releasing it until those bugs are fixed & taking the flak for it? Developing complex software means you are going to have bugs... it's about managing those & ensuring that the majority never see the light of day.

I've always been impressed by FD's ability to hit deadlines & release on time, but that clearly comes at a cost.

If someone buys and downloads E: D today, they'll probably play for a very short time before they start encountering lots of silly, minor, things... but taken together create a perception that is, well, not good. :( Some of these bugs have been around for years, because the more you release quickly rather than well, the more compounded the problem becomes.

People's perceptions are based mostly on that - rather than the noise of a forum.
 
I'd be interested in a copy for Xbox, I hope they have console support :)
I'll ask. Was always Windows-only. ;)

The software was actually free, but the USB dongley thing to allow it to run cost upwards of £100K a pop.

Really don't believe economics is the issue here though.
 
I'll ask. Was always Windows-only. ;)

The software was actually free, but the USB dongley thing to allow it to run cost upwards of £100K a pop.

Really don't believe economics is the issue here though.
My point was that developing software to run on a customer's dodgy platform / console adds a whole other layer of complexity. And then you add on their network setup, controllers etc etc. In some ways I'm surprised it ever works :)
 
My point was that developing software to run on a customer's dodgy platform / console adds a whole other layer of complexity. And then you add on their network setup, controllers etc etc. In some ways I'm surprised it ever works :)
You are so right! In fact I just spent the last 20 minutes rolling back an upgrade to .Net472 because we cant guarantee all of our internal users have it. (Just a Dev, not an FDev). So frustrating!! (At least it was before release)
 
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My point was that developing software to run on a customer's dodgy platform / console adds a whole other layer of complexity. And then you add on their network setup, controllers etc etc. In some ways I'm surprised it ever works :)
Whereas developing exclusively for a console removes all that complexity. This is why I'm actually a huge fan of console exclusives (as long as it's my console that gets the exclusives).

So there you go Frontier, make "New Era" a Playstation exclusive, and all your problems will be solved! :D
 
super, I did'nt test yet, but if it works as intended it's a great news.
I'm agree with the idea of more small fixes against less big fixes :)
 
I'll ask. Was always Windows-only. ;)
Hmm, that's surprising. And worrying. No matter how well-engineered your code is, deploying it on an unstable stack is hardly confidence-inducing. I'd've thought reactor safety systems would run on a custom real-time OS which undergoes the same stringent reviews as the application itself.
(Eh, sorry, getting rather OT).
 
We use 'engineers' however the still take an agile approach and are allowed to put buggy code into production.
how does agile sanction getting buggy code into production?

afaik it does just the opposite. agile builds on very conservative practices. actually, one 'commandment' of agile is unless a user story is 'done' (definition of 'done' varies but i would be damned if it doesn't include qa) it doesn't even qualify for the sprint, not even mention to be included in the release.

so actually quite the opposite with what you're saying.

agile is actually just a compendium of very sound ideas and practices, learnt by experience. bosses and third parties trying to make gospel from it for a quick buck or as a silver bullet is just what you would expect from the industry. so just say incompetence, not agile. business incompetence is what stains agile to the point of being superflous, albeit ubiquitous. this is no cave-man revelation, it's just common sense. agile is about doing perfect quality software in a transparent way. that sounds nice but it's not at all what the business really wants, so it's not how it is used.
 
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