How to install ED on Linux using Wine [EXPERIMENTAL, NOT OFFICIALLY SUPPORTED]

In the Steam Play Settings Proton 5.0-9 is enabled. How does installing '.net4 in it' go?
This happens on the first play, just press the play button and all this should happen automagically. You may get some errors pop up but just click ok and after a little time the elite launcher will pop up.
 
On Kubuntu 20.04 I deleted everything even remotey sounding like 'wine' and then switched to wine-stable, according to the instructions on https://wiki.winehq.org/Ubuntu.
The game works now. Seems that winetricks then is not needed.

And, as things go, an upgrade to wine staging 5.12 on OpenSuSE Leap 15.1 led to the same problem I had on Kubuntu 20.4.
It definitely must have to do something with upgrading to wine (staging) 5.12.
Installing the stable version of wine 5.12 here did not make a difference. The same error came back.
Pity OpenSuSE does not keep older versions to roll back.
 
Last edited:
The OP is pretty old now, and 60 pages in, I don't know where to start.
Debian 10, KDE, steam installed, functioning well.
Help?
 
The OP is pretty old now, and 60 pages in, I don't know where to start.
Debian 10, KDE, steam installed, functioning well.
Help?
use https://github.com/Matoking/protontricks protontricks to install dotnet40 under your proton environment for steam.
Click on the game and force it to use the compatibility mode and select the latest proton version.. (this might result in a re-install under the proton environment)
Play (in VR or regular)
 
  • Like (+1)
Reactions: EUS
Had the same problem a few days ago, also after an upgrade to wine 5.12.
I simply downgraded wine to version 5.11 and since then everything is running fine.
 
Have you enabled steam play in the settings?
Had the same problem a few days ago, also after an upgrade to wine 5.12.
I simply downgraded wine to version 5.11 and since then everything is running fine.
Wish I knew how to downgrade in an OpenSuSE environment. Its software management system does not seem to know of any older versions, neither do repos show them and where to find older rpm binaries is also unknown to me.
 
Wish I knew how to downgrade in an OpenSuSE environment. Its software management system does not seem to know of any older versions, neither do repos show them and where to find older rpm binaries is also unknown to me.
Sorry, wish I could help, but I'm not familiar with OpenSuSE.
But let me try...

Have you used zypper install 'wine-staging=5.10' ?
I guess it could work if the old version of wine is still available on your HD.
It definitely should work if you have added the correct repo which has the old (preferred) version still available.

According to the OpenSuSE Wine Repo it seems that wine-staging 5.11 never was available on OpenSuSE?
So the latest version before 5.12 was 5.10 and those binaries are still available for some OpenSuSE versions.
Check the link - binaries are available (manual download) and also instructions how to add repositories, if that is what you wish for.
 
is there a particular reason you are going about a harder way to play a steam game in wine than in the version of wine steam ships itself with and is already setup to work with the games it lets you install?
 
Sorry, wish I could help, but I'm not familiar with OpenSuSE.
But let me try...

Have you used zypper install 'wine-staging=5.10' ?
I guess it could work if the old version of wine is still available on your HD.
It definitely should work if you have added the correct repo which has the old (preferred) version still available.

According to the OpenSuSE Wine Repo it seems that wine-staging 5.11 never was available on OpenSuSE?
So the latest version before 5.12 was 5.10 and those binaries are still available for some OpenSuSE versions.
Check the link - binaries are available (manual download) and also instructions how to add repositories, if that is what you wish for.
Tried your suggestions, but to no avail.
The command zypper install 'wine-staging=5.10' says: No provider of 'wine-staging=5.10' found.
Older versions are indeed found in the Wine repo, like 5.09. They are meant for other SuSE distributions and when installing they require software packages that are already installed but somehow not recognized.

By the way: the Kubuntu version of wine I use is wine-stable 5.01. Not wine-staging 5.12.

The solution was to upgrade to OpenSuSE Leap 15.2.
That comes with wine-staging 5.0.
Beware of wine-staging 5.12!!! (Creepy noises in the background....)
 
Last edited:
is there a particular reason you are going about a harder way to play a steam game in wine than in the version of wine steam ships itself with and is already setup to work with the games it lets you install?
No particular reason at all. It has been more than one year and a half ago that I managed to install the game in OpenSuSE and I would not know anymore how I ever did it. But since then it has been running smoothly across all updates of wine en Elite Horizons itself.
When I use the steam app and check the properties of the game, it shows no 'Local Files', which makes me think that the Elite on the OpenSuSE does not know about Steam at all and that it communicates wit Frontier only.
 
well, assuming elite isn't the only game you play, it's immeasurably easier to just use steam's provided version of wine and not bother with distro versions (which often have issues with the 32bit variant of wine anyway as well as not including non-upstream performance improvements). It's the same across distros and already setup to streamline with all compatible games in steam (most seem to be compatible). The only thing you need to do is install dotnet40 for elite, which is a simple initial step that unfortunately, I dont think the steam client does and wine still requires this pkg as it doesn't fully implement it internally yet (but will).
 
well, assuming elite isn't the only game you play, it's immeasurably easier to just use steam's provided version of wine and not bother with distro versions (which often have issues with the 32bit variant of wine anyway as well as not including non-upstream performance improvements). It's the same across distros and already setup to streamline with all compatible games in steam (most seem to be compatible). The only thing you need to do is install dotnet40 for elite, which is a simple initial step that unfortunately, I dont think the steam client does and wine still requires this pkg as it doesn't fully implement it internally yet (but will).
I really would like how to get steams provided version of wine, just to see how that works.
At the moment, I am quite unsure about how Steam is involved with Elite.
To feed you some more information: on the same PC, which is multiboot, Elite Horizons works fine with Kubuntu. The game code is stored on a very different partition there then when using OpenSuSE.
The steam app on Kubuntu (I use the same credentials to log in) knows about me owning Elite dangerous (it does not mention horizons, though the text is in blue) and shows the location of the the Local Files. In the settings I have Steam Play enabled for supported files. At present it says that it has the Elite Dangerous - Updated queued.
When running the command
wine64 EDLaunch.exe /novr /steam
and when then an upgrade is present, the launcher stops with an error and tells me to go to steam and set things right.
But I don't do that. Instead I simply use the command
wine64 EDLaunch.exe /novr
and the upgrade takes place.
Makes me wonder what the role of Steam is here.
 
If you install elite dangerous thru steam (you purchased elite thru steam vs directly from frontier) ...then the purpose of steam is to update the game. That's handled thru steam rather than thru the client for primary updates (beta's still go thru the client directly). Steam also dictates how the game is launched, in normal, horizon or vr modes.

Steam's wine (steamplay / proton) is always installed with the steam client. It's part of it. So in linux, elite dangerous would show as being owned but not installed. You have to right click on the game and find the spot that says compatibility runtime or some such text and switch it to proton latest.

This will allow the install button to appear and you can install the game. If you have the game installed already in the same install directories that steam uses to install games, it may detect it already being installed and just validate. If not, you may want to point steam to it ....or just download a second copy. Whatever floats your boat.

Before installing though but after activating the compatibility runtime for this game. You'll want to make sure you install dotnet40 for the proton environment that comes with steam. This is done thru protontricks (which i linked in previous posts but may come with your distro...so check first). Once you install dotnet40, the game should be installable and runnable in all methods of playing (vr is awesome). It should be at native windows speed or just a tad shy of it due to using a DirectX -> vulkan wrapper for rendering.

It might be helpful to just watch a video or something about how to use steamplay/proton in steam in general ...as it is done the same way for all games (except the dotnet40 install thing).

It's really rather simple and works fairly well. I haven't had to boot into windows to play a game in well over a year. It would be a flustercuck to try and get wine32 and wine64 working on a current debian system without basically building the entire xorg install and wine myself. Proton thankfully just comes with steam and works.

if prototricks/winetricks doesn't work out with your distro in targetting proton from your steam install, you may have better luck using Lutris to do that job ...


Or you can just try doing it with the current version without installing these prereqs. The howto's were created a while ago and may no longer be necessary. Worst case is the game fails to launch when you try to..in which case you'll have to install those prereqs and try again.
 
Last edited:
Seems to work using proton 5.0-9, got to start screen, didn't try further, have to install HOTAS, and find my old bindings file.

Install, run once, then
Code:
protontricks 359320 -q dotnet472 win7
in the .../steamapps/compatdata/359320/pfx folder
 
If you install elite dangerous thru steam (you purchased elite thru steam vs directly from frontier) ...then the purpose of steam is to update the game. That's handled thru steam rather than thru the client for primary updates (beta's still go thru the client directly). Steam also dictates how the game is launched, in normal, horizon or vr modes.

Steam's wine (steamplay / proton) is always installed with the steam client. It's part of it. So in linux, elite dangerous would show as being owned but not installed. You have to right click on the game and find the spot that says compatibility runtime or some such text and switch it to proton latest.

This will allow the install button to appear and you can install the game. If you have the game installed already in the same install directories that steam uses to install games, it may detect it already being installed and just validate. If not, you may want to point steam to it ....or just download a second copy. Whatever floats your boat.

Before installing though but after activating the compatibility runtime for this game. You'll want to make sure you install dotnet40 for the proton environment that comes with steam. This is done thru protontricks (which i linked in previous posts but may come with your distro...so check first). Once you install dotnet40, the game should be installable and runnable in all methods of playing (vr is awesome). It should be at native windows speed or just a tad shy of it due to using a DirectX -> vulkan wrapper for rendering.

It might be helpful to just watch a video or something about how to use steamplay/proton in steam in general ...as it is done the same way for all games (except the dotnet40 install thing).

It's really rather simple and works fairly well. I haven't had to boot into windows to play a game in well over a year. It would be a flustercuck to try and get wine32 and wine64 working on a current debian system without basically building the entire xorg install and wine myself. Proton thankfully just comes with steam and works.

if prototricks/winetricks doesn't work out with your distro in targetting proton from your steam install, you may have better luck using Lutris to do that job ...


Or you can just try doing it with the current version without installing these prereqs. The howto's were created a while ago and may no longer be necessary. Worst case is the game fails to launch when you try to..in which case you'll have to install those prereqs and try again.
I made the adjustments in Steam:
Steamplay Settings to:
'Enable steam play for supported files'
'Enable steam play for all other titles'
Run all other titles with Proton 5.0-9

Account: Beta participation enabled.

Elite dangerous settings, General: Enable the Steam overlay while in-game.

Then I ran protontricks for Elite to install dotnet40.
Then, from Steam, I installed Elite Dangerous.
Steam then creates a desktop shortcut.
This shortcut does not work. It give the following command: steam steam://rungameid/359320

However, EDLaunch.exe does work. But EDLaunch uses wine. So I suppose wine must be remain installed?
 
Last edited:
Then I ran protontricks for Elite to install dotnet40.
Then, from Steam, I installed Elite Dangerous.
Steam then creates a desktop shortcut.
This shortcut does not work. It give the following command: steam steam://rungameid/359320

However, EDLaunch.exe does work. But EDLaunch uses wine. So I suppose wine must be remain installed?
Both EDLaunch.exe and Elite itself use Wine/Proton. The issue is that the launcher, and only the launcher iirc, also needs dotnet40. It might've not worked for you this time because you ran protontricks before installing the game in steam, so dotnet40 was never actually installed in the game's wine/proton prefix and the launcher never appeared.
Now that you've already tried to launch the game with Proton, it probably created the needed wine/proton prefix. You can try installing dotnet40 with protontricks again, and launch the game from steam to see if the launcher works after that
 
Both EDLaunch.exe and Elite itself use Wine/Proton. The issue is that the launcher, and only the launcher iirc, also needs dotnet40. It might've not worked for you this time because you ran protontricks before installing the game in steam, so dotnet40 was never actually installed in the game's wine/proton prefix and the launcher never appeared.
Now that you've already tried to launch the game with Proton, it probably created the needed wine/proton prefix. You can try installing dotnet40 with protontricks again, and launch the game from steam to see if the launcher works after that
Just to be sure: what if I completely remove Elite, wine, winetricks and protontricks from my hard disc? Can I then start the steam app and get Elite going from there? Steam knows about me being the owner of the game. It knows I have the keys for Elite Dangerous, for the Horizons Season Pass and for the Elite dangerous Commander Pack.
 
Top Bottom