Star Citizen Discussion Thread v12

Well software patents are in my opinion ridiculous, and stall the development of everything. I understand that code itself can be copyrighted, and say assets can be copyrighted, making lets say cloning of say ED's ships for other game no-no. But apart from that it should be perfectly lawfull to copy mechanisms and workflows, and mathematical algorithms.
The problem here, though, is that CI¬G has a history. Not only have they followed a path of strictly derivative minimum-effort artwork, brazenly copying ideas and designs from wherever without a shred of creativity or actual artistry, but they have engage in outright art theft and copyright violations. They've used unlicensed trademarked real-world company logos, unlicensed stock art, assets stolen from deviantart, and very poorly painted-over original works of unaffiliated (and unpaid) artists right in their commercial product and in the marketing material for the game. “Archering” has become a project meme for a reason. And that's before we even get into the engine lawsuit…

As such, at this point, it is by no means a stretch of the imagination to suggest that they've outright stolen some design outright, only adding the most minute amount of greebles to call it their own, just so they can meet some minimal legal requirement of distinction well enough not to have the work yanked out of the code. Ridiculing them for blatantly steeling art and incompetently covering it up is just par for the course — it's part and parcel of this (ostensibly creative) company's overarching incompetence and inability to… well… create. Anything.

They're creatively bankrupt in every way imaginable, be it code, design, art, or any other aspect of game-making you can think of. Theft is in their genes.
 
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Well software patents are in my opinion ridiculous, and stall the development of everything. I understand that code itself can be copyrighted, and say assets can be copyrighted, making lets say cloning of say ED's ships for other game no-no. But apart from that it should be perfectly lawfull to copy mechanisms and workflows, and mathematical algorithms. At worst these kind of patent laws produce "lawyer inventors", people just making some fuzzy concept on paper, without ever makin real working piece of stuff, and then waiting patiently in background ready to pounce when somebody makes anything like that fuzzy concept for real. One example of particularly brazen behauviour was one lawyer who had patented idea of multitasking OS with GUI. And tried to demand cash from Microsoft and Apple. Well they brought to court fully working Amiga 1000, which predates such patent, and has multitasking OS with GUI. Patent was rightfully thrown out...
Patents are just an example of stuff that developers need to be aware of sadly. ED's ships are intellectual property protected by copyright not specific patent. My point was merely that as with the EVE and Hello Kitty dibacle, it highlight a lapse in process that a professional developer in the businesss of delivering actual entertainment software rather than pay to win dlc for a game they never finished would natuarally avoid.
 
Elevator panels down 12%

I think i just have to resign myself to understanding that elevator panel development is hard.



Funny how the Nomad goes to 100% instantly, because, you know, the most open development ever totally failed to put the Nomad on the roadmap while they were actually working on it.
 
A small info grabbed from the last post-mortem post

"As part of T1, we also added a UI ‘throw arc’ that allows you to see the trajectory of the grenade. While currently this is enabled for all helmets, it will only be accessible from combat helmets once we start to define different armor archetypes in the verse."

I love the idea to get special UI for combat helmets.
Combat helmets have in-built display for grenades, yet fighter pilots have to deal with a static front HUD and info panels? (I may be wrong since I don't play it, but from looking at Sovapid's adventures, I can't see any HMD.)
 
Patents are just an example of stuff that developers need to be aware of sadly.
Fortunately, this is not true:

"Article 52 of the European Patent Convention
The European Patent Convention (EPC), Article 52, paragraph 2, excludes from patentability, in particular
  1. discoveries, scientific theories and mathematical methods;
  2. aesthetic creations;
  3. schemes, rules and methods for performing mental acts, playing games or doing business, and programs for computers;
  4. presentations of information."
When I worked at Codemasters circa 2000 awareness of industry products was essential, there were regular training seminars and they had an early "intranet" knowledge base with loads of interesting stuff about what you could and coudn't do in a racing game for example. Atari had patents for ghost car mechanics from the Hard Drivin' days, so loads of neat cool obvious stuff simply can't be done. Having anything that looked like a direct competitors product is a no no as it would weaken IP and risk litegation. It's the basic stuff that games companies do.
There are many companies were it is forbidden for developers (of whatever, not just software) to read patents, to avoid being liable for willful infringement. In those companies, only the lawyers/attorneys are permitted to check the patents of competitors.
 
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Fortunately, this is not true:

"Article 52 of the European Patent Convention
The European Patent Convention (EPC), Article 52, paragraph 2, excludes from patentability, in particular
  1. discoveries, scientific theories and mathematical methods;
  2. aesthetic creations;
  3. schemes, rules and methods for performing mental acts, playing games or doing business, and programs for computers;
  4. presentations of information."

There are many companies were it is forbidden for developers (of whatever, not just software) to read patents, to avoid being liable for willful infringement. In those companies, only the lawyers/attorneys are permitted to check the patents of competitors.
Problem is that games are global business, and US does have software patents.
 
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